Where is the Illinois River Road?
Traversing both east and west sides of the Illinois River from Ottawa, 150 miles south to Havana, the Illinois River Road has spurs to the communities of Princeton and Canton. The Illinois River Road corridor has over 100 natural and historic sites and numerous unique communities located throughout its 10-county region.

The Scenic Byway is conveniently located between Chicago and St. Louis, but just far enough to get away from it all. So get off the beaten path and see what the Illinois River Road has in store for you!

  
  


Illinois Scenic Byways

Illinois Scenic Byways


Illinois River Road Report

Illinois River Road Report


Like Us on Facebook

Like Us on Facebook



Sign-up for Our E-mail List

Join our e-mail list to receive future specials, events and information about the
Illinois River Road National Scenic Byway. *The Illinois River Road does not share or sell email lists.

Sign Up Now!
 

Marshall State Fish & Wildlife Area
236 State Rt 26, Lacon, IL 61540



Listing Photo Initiated in 1925, the Marshall State Fish & Wildlife Area presently includes about 6,000 acres spread over 3 different units along 10 miles of Illinois River shoreline. All three sites are worth a stop if touring the river for spring and fall migrations of waterfowl or shorebirds and wintering eagles. At 3,000 acres, the Marshall Unit is the largest, and houses primitive and full hook-up campsites, and a boat launch, along with the sites headquarters building. A 3.25-mile trail system that starts to the east of the headquarters building climbs through bluff and ravine hardwood forests home to woodpeckers and woodland warblers. The areas 1,642-acre Spring Branch Unit is located directly across the Illinois River from the Marshall Unit, and features a 6-acre picnic area, hiking trail, and canoe access. Several miles to the north of the Spring Branch Unit lies the 1,280-acre Sparland Unit, which is comprised mostly of open water, and hosts good numbers of ducks and geese. Each of the units features bluff/ravine and bottomland hardwood forests. Beyond birds, common forest mammals include fox, Gray and Flying squirrels, and White-tailed Deer. For those willing to rise early enough to visit the bottomland forests at dawn especially where they interface with water – Raccoons, muskrat, mink, and beaver can often be observed.


View Website Map & Driving Directions


GPS: 40.95450, -89.42854
Site Access: free; fee for camping
Phone: (309) 246-8351



< Return to Previous Page